What Neuroscience Can Teach Leaders About Feedback

Feedback:  The never ending mystery! Here is yet another installment in the series on what we have to learn about Leadership from the study of neuroscience.

Feedback:

  1. Hire for Feedback Orientation. Individuals, who have feedback orientation like feedback, believe it has value, seek it regularly, have the wherewithal to process feedback with and without help, are sensitive to others’ view of themselves and generally feel accountable to act on feedback (London and Smither).  Ask yourself about your own feedback orientation?  Are you a role model for asking for and receiving feedback?

2.   Build a culture in which feedback is natural and given in the moment.   A culture of feedback is :

“…one where individuals continuously receive, solicit, and use formal and informal feedback to improve their job performance.  This may be linked to effective policies and programs for performance management, continuous learning and career development. The individual’s feedback orientation depends in part on the support and climate for learning.  The more frequent the feedback and the closer it follows the behavior in question, the more likely it is to be accepted.  The more support [from you the leader] for learning and development, including the availability of behaviorally-oriented feedback, the more the individual is likely to develop a positive orientation toward feedback. ” (London and Smither)

3. People who have sustained a great deal of trauma are going to have a very hard time distinguishing a real threat from a potential one (Rock).  This means that workers who go through rounds of layoffs and are not given new information to raise their levels of certainty will most probably become less and less able to receive any critical feedback.  Only people working in an environment where they feel safe will be open to learning, be more likely to have insights and be generally more creative and productive (Gordon).

 

Image from Grant Cochrane

One thought on “What Neuroscience Can Teach Leaders About Feedback

  1. The trust valence, when broken, like the atom changes everything. It is difficult to “reconstruct” that trust. Regardless of feedback at that point it all relies on the resilience of the person. The problem is many are not that resilient and never really understand even with feedback, why they were terminated.

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