Who Is My Audience?

I recently saw a well-known company’s new ad campaign for the first time. And while I thought it was creative and well-executed, I couldn’t help but think that it likely wouldn’t resonate with 75% of their target audience. And while that in itself is a big problem, a bigger problem came to mind…not only would the campaign likely not resonate with that large and substantial majority of their audience, but it might actually offend or push some of them away altogether.

Obviously, I doubt pushing existing or potential clients away is that company’s intent. However, it reminds us of a very important question we all need to ask at times…
“who is my audience?”

Whether you’re an organization unleashing a new ad campaign or a leader trying to influence a call to action, it’s important to know and understand your audience. You might have the greatest idea in the world but if you aren’t able to pitch it in a way that appeals to your audience, then it becomes a wasted effort.

Leadership is about influence. And in order to influence, you must be able to connect with your audience. Once you’ve identified your audience, consider their demographic profile to make sure you’re connecting on a relatable level. Try to identify potential problems with your approach up front so that you can correct ahead of time. If you think your message could possibly alienate or offend a portion of your audience, stop and adjust.

The next time you find your leadership influence isn’t influencing, stop and ask yourself, “who is my audience?”

Can you think of a time where your message wasn’t effective, or you got into trouble, because you weren’t in tune with your audience?

Follow me on Twitter: @adammorris21 | Add me on Google+: gplus.to/AdamMorris21

2 thoughts on “Who Is My Audience?

  1. You are so right! I recently listened to a keynote speaker who was really different, and brilliant – and the basic message was “public school killed my creativity” – however the audience was the 2012 graduating class of a university. While some of the audience appreciated the message, and the young, slick, eye-grabbing delivery, was interesting, the references were not generation-appropriate and the message did not sit well with the school leadership. What could have been a phenomonal “hit” ended up to be much less powerful.

    • Great example…thanks Trish! Imagine if the speaker conveyed the same basic message but, after considering their audience, instead approached it from the perspective of, “now that you’ve concluded this chapter in your formal education, continue to learn and grow by seeking out and taking advantage of informal, non-traditional learning opportunities.” A subtle shift can make a world of difference.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s